DirectCourse CQL Package

Coming soon

Includes Personal Outcome Measures® Training

DirectCourse has partnered with the Council on Quality and Leadership (CQL) to provide online training for CQL’s Personal Outcome Measures®, a critical component in accreditation for human services organizations.

Personal Outcome Measures® focus on helping such organizations deliver quality services that are defined by the people they support via a person-centered approach.

This DirectCourse content, developed by the University of Minnesota’s Research and Training Center on Community Living in collaboration with CQL, is part of the CQL Package offered through DirectCourse College of Direct Support.

Combining the best educational resources with the convenience and affordability of anytime, anywhere online training, the courses in this package were specifically designed for direct support professionals and others who work to improve the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Click here to contact us for more information about this new offering.

DirectCourse CQL Package

NEW! Personal Outcome Measures® courses (coming soon)

Existing College of Direct Support Courses included in CQL Package:

All Course Descriptions are below.


The following College of Direct Support (CDS) courses are recommended as training for CQL’s Personal Outcome Measures© as required by a direct support professional who is supporting CQL outcomes. (4 total)

What Really Matters

The course What Really Matters: Overview and Value of Personal Outcome Measures is designed for direct support professionals who are interested in improving the lives of the people they serve by ensuring that personal outcomes are being met.  The Council on Quality and Leadership’s Personal Outcome Measures (POMs) are a way of considering what is important to a person and organizing them into personal outcome statements that can be assessed.  This course is the first of four courses that will provide an overview of POMs and how POMs can be used to help to improve the quality of life for people.  It is meant to provide learners with a foundation of core concepts and vocabulary regarding the use of POMs in everyday service delivery.  In this course, learners will be introduced to POMs – what they are and how they were developed.  They will learn about how POMs differ from other types of outcomes, such as clinical and functional outcomes.  Learners will be shown how POMs support a person-centered approach and enhanced quality in human services.  Learners will be given examples of ways to engage a person in discussing their personal outcomes and how to gather pertinent information from those discussions.  Learners will also be shown what goes into the decision making process for determining whether or not a POM is present or not in someone’s life.  This course could be used as a general overview to understanding how an outcome based view of quality can be helpful. It can be a pre-requisite to trainings that are part of the Council on Quality and Leadership’s in-person comprehensive training. They can be a refresher once in person training is complete.  However, they are not intended to replace the in-person training or provide comprehensive training in this area.

 

My Self

The course My Self: A Factor of the Personal Outcome Measures is designed for direct support professionals who are interested in improving the lives of the people they serve by ensuring that personal outcomes are being met.  The Council on Quality and Leadership’s Personal Outcome Measures (POMs) are a way of considering what is important to a person and organizing them into personal outcome statements that can be assessed.  This course is the second of four courses that will provide an overview of POMs and how POMs can be used to help to improve the quality of life for people.  It is meant to provide learners with a foundation of core concepts and vocabulary regarding the factor of My Self.  In this course, learners will delve deeper into the indicators of My Self.  They will learn about how each indicator is part of someone’s life and personal outcomes.  Learners will be given examples of ways to support each indicator in someone’s life.  Learners will also be shown what goes into the decision making process for determining whether or not a POM is present or not in someone’s life.  This course could be used as a general overview to understanding how an outcome based view of quality can be helpful. It can be a pre-requisite to trainings that are part of the Council on Quality and Leadership’s in-person comprehensive training. They can be a refresher once in-person training is complete. However, they are not intended to replace the in-person training or provide comprehensive training in this area.

 

My World

The course My World: A Factor of the Personal Outcome Measures is designed for direct support professionals who are interested in improving the lives of the people they serve by ensuring that personal outcomes are being met.  The Council on Quality and Leadership’s Personal Outcome Measures (POMs) are a way of considering what is important to a person and organizing them into personal outcome statements that can be assessed.  This course is the third of four courses that will provide an overview of POMs and how POMs can be used to help to improve the quality of life for people.  It is meant to provide learners with a foundation of core concepts and vocabulary regarding the factor of My World. In this course, learners will delve deeper into the indicators of My World.  They will learn about how each indicator is part of someone’s life and personal outcomes.  Learners will be given examples of ways to support each indicator in someone’s life.  Learners will also be shown what goes into the decision making process for determining whether or not a POM is present or not in someone’s life.  This course could be used as a general overview to understanding how an outcome based view of quality can be helpful. It can be a pre-requisite to trainings that are part of the Council on Quality and Leadership’s in-person comprehensive training. They can be a refresher once in-person training is complete. However, they are not intended to replace the in-person training or provide comprehensive training in this area.

 

My Dreams

The Course My Dreams- A Factor of the Personal Outcome Measures is designed for direct support professionals who are interested in improving the lives of the people they serve by helping them choose personal goals and realize them, participate in the life of their community, have friends, and are respected.  These five indicators provide understanding of what is important to a person and offer a tool for organizing that information into personal outcome statements. This course is the fourth of four courses that will provide an overview of POMs and how POMs can be used to improve the quality of life for people. It is meant to provide learners with a foundation of core concepts and vocabulary regarding the factor of My Dreams. In this course, learners will delve deeper into the indicators of My Dreams. They will learn how each indicator is part of someone’s life and personal outcomes. Learners will be given examples of ways to support each indicator in someone’s life. Learners will also be shown what goes into the decision making process for determining whether or not a POM is present or not in a person’s life. This course could be use as a general overview to understanding how an outcome based view of quality can be helpful. It can be a prerequisite to trainings that are part of the Council on Quality and Leadership’s in person comprehensive training. They can be a refresher once in person training is complete. However, they are not intended to replace the in-person training or provide comprehensive training in this area.

 


The following College of Direct Support (CDS) courses are recommended as supporting the core or foundational skills needed by a direct support professional who is supporting CQL outcomes. (10 total)

Civil Rights and Advocacy

This course was developed to help you understand your role in supporting individuals with disabilities as they stand up for their rights. You will learn what it takes to be an effective advocate for and with the people you support. You will learn about the challenges faced when individuals with disabilities try to exercise their rights. Finally, you will learn what strategies can be used to overcome these challenges.

Lesson 1: Your Role in Effective Advocacy
    In this lesson you will learn about your role as an advocate. This includes advocating on behalf of those you support. It also means assisting individuals to advocate for themselves. You will increase your knowledge, improve your skills, and create positive change for those you support. This lesson will help you understand the skills, characteristics, and attitudes needed for effective advocacy. Finally, this lesson will help you understand how important professional boundaries are in supporting the advocacy process.
Lesson 2: History of the Disability Rights Movement
    In this lesson you will learn about the major rights movements that have occurred in our society. This lesson includes information about the issues faced in the disability rights movement. You will learn about some of the successful strategies used. You will learn about the different stages of the disability rights movement. It will also help you to explore how your actions and beliefs affect the rights of those you support.
Lesson 3: Disability Rights and Legislation
    This lesson is about your role as a direct support professional in ensuring the civil rights of the people you support. You will learn about the role of laws, regulations, and courts in protecting civil rights. Major court cases and laws will be covered. This includes the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
Lesson 4: Challenges and Strategies for Exercising Civil Rights
    This lesson is about the challenges an individual with a disability can face when he or she tries to exercise his or her rights. You will learn about how personal factors can impact a person’s ability to exercise her or his rights. This lesson will help you identify these factors. It will provide a deeper understanding of how outside factors interfere with a person’s ability to exercise his or her rights. Finally, this lesson will provide ideas and strategies to help you and the person you support overcome these challenges.

 

Community Inclusion

This course helps DSPs understand their roles in supporting the inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in the communities in which they live and work. It provides an overview of inclusion and why it is important, and the learner is given strategies for enhancing inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities.

Lesson 1: The DSP Role in Community Inclusion
    Many people with support needs spend a significant portion of their lives segregated from others in their communities. While things have improved in the last several years, full inclusion for many people is still not achieved. This lesson describes inclusion. It helps the learner understand why integration is critical but is not enough. It reviews the benefits and structure of social roles. Direct support professional’s roles will need to change in order to achieve more inclusive communities. This lesson briefly reviews some of these changes.
Lesson 2: Matching Community Resources with Individual Interests
    Inclusion is more likely when people are connected to community through their interests. This lesson helps the learner identify people’s interests and strengths. Learners are guided in how to discriminate between activities that are likely to lead to inclusion and those that are not. They are provided with information on how to overcome barriers to inclusion.
Lesson 3: Community Bridge-Building and Networking
    Community Bridge Building is a set of methods for helping the community develop capacity to support people with diverse needs. At the same time, the needs of the individual are being met through enhanced connections to others. This lesson covers strategies such as volunteering, frequenting, joining, and networking.
Lesson 4: Natural Supports
    Natural support is a way of describing a natural state of interdependence that is expected in families, neighborhoods, and communities. Some people have been isolated from others. Some have even been separated from families. In these cases, natural supports can be absent. Helping people connect to natural supports helps them experience better lives. It helps them rely less on expensive and segregated special services. It provides richer family lives and communities for all of us. This lesson describes natural supports. It demonstrated how to implement strategies that help people create lives in which natural supports are present.

 

Cultural Competence

This course is an overview of cultural competence and its importance in daily support to people with disabilities. The learner is helped to understand the key components of cultural competence including: valuing diversity; recognizing one’s own culture and the culture of others; and having the resources and ability to adjust one’s behavior to meet the needs of the situation. Learners are asked to reflect on their capacities in these areas at different points during the course. The learner is given many opportunities to learn more about their own culture and reflect on the similarities and differences with other cultures.

Lesson 1: What is Cultural Competence?
    This lesson explains why cultural competence is critical to quality direct support work. The lesson defines terms used in this course including culture, race, ethnicity, diversity, cultural competence, and affiliation. The learner is introduced to five important elements of and a continuum of cultural competence. Through a series of reflections, the learner begins to identify his or her own culture.
Lesson 2: Understanding You Own Culture
    This lesson helps the learner develop an awareness of his or her own culture through a series of reflections. The learner answers questions about his or her own background. Then, she or he compares these responses to those of people from various backgrounds.
Lesson 3: The Culture of Support Services
    This lesson defines terms used in this course including cultural capital, institutional bias, macro culture and micro culture. Some key values and views that are part of the macro culture of the United States and the service system are reviewed. Learners explore differences in definitions and responses to disability based on culture as well as how cultural competence applies to the cycle of supports. Learners also learn about ways that best practices can be applied without cultural competence.
Lesson 4: The Continuum
    This lesson explores the six stages of cultural competence in-depth. Each stage is explained and examples are given. The learner identifies where examples fall along the continuum. We also ask the learner to reflect on his or her own level of Cultural Competence.
Lesson 5: Cross-Cultural Communication
    This lesson describes the purpose and methods of communication. Cultural differences in communication patterns are reviewed. Learners will learn strategies for improving cross-cultural communication.
Lesson 6: Cultural Competence in Daily Support
    This lesson helps learners understand how to apply cultural competence throughout the cycle of support services. Learners will explore strategies and methods for adapting or revising assessments and common formats for gathering information from people receiving supports. Ideas for learning more about the norms of specific cultures are explored.
Lesson 7: Direct Support Professional Roles in Culturally Competent Organizations
    This lesson is helpful for the direct support professional who is part of an organization that is seeking to become more culturally competent. The importance of organizational competence is reviewed. The lesson includes ways that the five elements of cultural competence apply to organizations. The learner explores positive ways for direct support professionals to assess the level and support the development of cultural competence within their organization.

 

Direct Support Professionalism

This course introduces the learner to the importance and benefits of a professional orientation to the DSP role and to the history and status of the professionalism movement. The national movement to professionalize direct support is described. The reasons why professionalism is important, progress that has been made in creating a profession and how DSPs can become part of the professionalism movement are included. An ethical code for DSPs is reviewed along with ways of applying these ethical guidelines in daily practice.

Lesson 1: Becoming a Direct Support Professional
    This lesson introduces the learner to the vocation of direct support. It does this by clarifying what direct support professionals do, who they work with, and what settings they work in. The lesson will also address professionalism, first generically then in the context of direct support. It will also discuss the numerous roles direct support professionals play in supporting people. There will also be a brief discussion about how these roles have changed over time.
Lesson 2: Contemporary Best Practices
    There are many characteristics of being a direct support professional. In this lesson, we explore the contemporary best practices. Specifically, this lesson will address best practice approaches to supporting people with disabilities with suggestions on how to integrate them into your practice. Finally, the lesson also identifies ways the direct support professional can expand his or her knowledge of best practices.
Lesson 3: Applying Ethics in Everyday Work
    In providing supports, it is the direct support professional’s responsibility to be ethical. In this lesson, we define ethics and explore why ethical practice is important. The lesson also presents the direct support professionals’ Code of Ethics. Finally, this lesson provides an overview of common characteristics of ethical dilemmas. It also provides a framework to resolve them.
Lesson 4: Practicing Confidentiality
    This lesson will review the importance for the direct support professional (DSP) to protect confidentiality. The lesson will begin by introducing the learner to confidentiality. It will then describe methods and strategies the DSP can use to ensure confidentiality. Finally, the lesson will describe the consenting procedures and describe common ways confidentiality is breached.
Lesson 5: Working with Your Strengths and Interests
    In this lesson, you will focus on identifying your strengths and interests, discovering ways to use your strengths to support persons with developmental disabilities, and reflecting and developing personal and professional development plans.

 

Everyone Can Communicate

It is important for you, as a Direct Support Professional, to develop and apply skills in understanding, respecting, and supporting people who have communication problems in order to be effective. This course is designed to help you improve your skills in providing communication supports. You will learn about a variety of communication methods. These include speech, gestures and sign, communication boards, devices that “talk”, or other forms of sending and receiving information.

Lesson 1: What is Communication and Why is it Important?
    In this lesson you will learn about the basics of communication. You will learn why communication is so important in everyone’s life. You will be introduced to the process and components of communication. The lesson will help you understand the difference between speech, language and communication. You will learn about the different components of communication. The lesson will help you recognize communication barriers and breakdowns that affect understanding. You will learn some of the strategies that help facilitate communication. It will also provide information about the Communication Bill of Rights, and much more.
Lesson 2: How People Communicate
    We all communicate in many different ways about different things and for different reasons. This lesson provides information and exercises to help the learner gain an understanding of all the different ways we all communicate. The learner becomes a good observer of non-speech communication – both typical and individualized. The learner is encouraged to explore myths and biases about non-speech communication. Learning to use naturally-occurring gestures is an important outcome of this lesson.
Lesson 3: The Role of the Direct Support Professional as a Communication Partner
    Direct Support Professionals (DSP) are important communication partners. This lesson recognizes and acknowledges the importance of the DSP as influencing social communication, choices offered, and self-determination. It also looks at how the DSP currently encourages participation, provides opportunities for choice and control, and facilitates community participation.
Lesson 4: Strategies to Enhance Communication
    Strategies to Enhance Communication. There are many things you can do as a direct support professional to enhance communication. This lesson introduces effective strategies. It also helps you apply them. Approaches such as modeling, waiting, and contingent responding will increase your ability to communicate with the people you support. This in turn will help you support the empowerment, participation, and self-advocacy of those you support.
Lesson 5: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
    Augmentative and alternative communications (AAC) approaches are effective ways to enhance or augment spoken language. In this lesson you will be introduced to the range and scope of aided and unaided AAC approaches. Your role in AAC selection and implementation of an AAC approach will be introduced. Myths regarding AAC and the development of speech will be addressed.

 

Individual Rights and Choice

In this course, the learner gains knowledge of the rights of individuals with disabilities including a brief overview of relevant laws and their historical roots. It teaches how to balance the right to take risks with the right to be protected from harm, and provides valuable skills in facilitating choice-making by the individuals to whom DSPs provide support. It is recommended that the learner complete the course on Maltreatment of Vulnerable Adults and Children along with this course to better understand rights. While this course discusses many federal laws that concern the rights of individuals with disabilities, state and local communities also have laws that pertain to rights. Learners are encouraged to contact their state or local government representatives and their supervisor to find out about local laws. Agencies are encouraged to use the tailoring options of the CDS to identify state and local laws and information that DSPs should know.

Lesson 1: Overview of Individual Rights
    This lesson will teach about the many aspects of individual rights. It will cover what a right is; definitions of important terms in understanding rights identify where rights come from, and what rights people with disabilities who receive services have.
Lesson 2: Restrictions of Individual Rights
    In this lesson you will learn about how to identify when rights are being restricted. Sometimes certain rights are legally restricted due to a change in the legal status of the person being served. This occurs when the person has been legally determined incompetent to make independent choices. Other times rights are unnecessarily restricted by people in support roles. You will also begin to understand the challenge of balancing risks with rights.
Lesson 3: Overcoming A Past of Barriers, a Future of Risks, Choices, and Solutions
    This lesson describes important historical events in which violations of rights for individuals with disabilities were common. The importance of knowing the history of rights restrictions and barriers for people with disabilities so that history does not repeat itself. It identifies common barriers to individuals being able to express their rights and reviews important pieces of federal legislation and related national events that identify certain rights for people with disabilities.
Lesson 4: Your Role in Supporting Expression of Rights and Facilitating Choice
    As a Direct Support Professional, you have many opportunities to facilitate choice making and to support individuals in expressing their rights. This lesson will teach you valuable knowledge to help you fulfill your crucial roles in the lives of people with disabilities.

 

Person Centered Planning and Supports

This course will help learners understand the foundational concepts and values of Person-Centered Planning and the benefits of this type of planning. The history of Person-Centered Planning is reviewed.  The course includes an overview of five different types of planning as they are done today.  It includes information and tips on participating meaningfully in a Person-Centered Plan. The course outlines steps that help the direct support professional bring these plans to life. Common challenges to person-centered services are reviewed and the learner is given a chance to learn about and create solutions to these types of challenges.

Lesson 1: Foundations of Person-Centered Planning
    This lesson is an overview of person-centered planning. The core concepts and values of this planning approach are reviewed. Some of the key historical events that influenced the development of person-centered planning are reviewed. The lesson contrasts person-centered planning with system-centered planning. It looks at how process and outcomes in these two types of planning differ from each other. Finally, some benefits and challenges of facilitated person-centered planning are reviewed.
Lesson 2: An Overview of Person-Centered Approaches
    Here is a description of the lesson you are starting: This lesson reviews several person-centered planning methods. This overview helps the learner become familiar with different methods. The review includes who developed the method. It identifies some unique characteristics of each one. It is a starting point to helping people find competent facilitators.
Lesson 3: The Person-Centered Planning Process
    This lesson helps the learner prepare to participate in person-centered planning. The lesson describes the role of the direct support professional in this process. Direct support professionals may help in many ways with person-centered planning. They may help educate and prepare others. They may participate in the actual planning event. They may be key people to follow-up on items in an action plan.
Lesson 4: Bringing Person-Centered Plans to Life
    This lesson helps direct support professionals and others understand barriers and challenges to keeping focused on person-centered supports. It provides strategies for avoiding and overcoming these challenges.

 

You’ve Got A Friend

This course explores the importance and meaning of human relationships in the lives of all people, including people of all ages with disabilities. In it the learner reflects on the benefits that healthy relationships bring to people’s lives and why they are valuable. The learner identifies the common perceptions and prejudices about people with disabilities that create barriers to social relationships. The learner is taught the common challenges that DSPs face when supporting people in developing and maintaining relationships and specific strategies for overcoming these challenges. In addition, the learner explores family relationships and how to effectively support these special long-term relationships that are so important to people with developmental disabilities.

Lesson 1: The Importance of Relationships
    This lesson explores the common bond of all people–the desire to be connected to others. Learners will identify important benefits that are part of having an active social network and the variety of relationship that make up social networks. Learners will examine their own social network and a social network of someone they support in order to identify some differences that are common between social networks of people receiving supports and the people who support them.
Lesson 2: Barriers, Challenges, and Opportunities for Friendships
    This lesson examines the factors that can make it hard for people to connect with others and some key obstacles that can prevent the development and ability to maintain relationships. These obstacles include such things as the effects of segregation, stigma, poverty, inaccessible accommodations, lack of transportation, and other barriers. Learners will explore some of the common patterns of experience shared by people with disabilities that often make it harder for them to develop a deep and diverse social network. They will learn how person-centered approaches are more effective than deficit based planning in overcoming these barriers to relationships.
Lesson 3: Strategies for Building and Maintaining Relationships
    This lesson will examine the importance of the direct service role in supporting people to build and maintain relationships. It will provide learners with an overview of some tools that direct support professionals (DSPs) can use to facilitate the development and maintenance of relationships and provide opportunities to practice with these tools. Common fears and questions that DSPs and others have regarding the implications of supporting relationships and the risks involved in these relationships.
Lesson 4: Supporting Family Networks
    This lesson provides an overview of the diversity in American family life and examines how culture affects lifestyle. It also focused on the unique issues that families confront when raising a child with a disability. The lesson will introduce learners to a family-centered planning practice (FOCUS). This family centered planning can help direct support professionals to support healthy family relationships and will provide learners with an opportunity to apply this technique.

 

Working with Families and Support Networks

Everyone has family and support networks in their lives. These are the people who surround you. These are people with whom you develop relationships. They add quality, meaning and enjoyment that enrich your life. People with disabilities who receive support are not any different. They have families and support networks which are intensely important to the quality of their lives. This course will help you understand the importance of support networks. It will help you develop working partnerships with families and other support networks. You will learn the importance of family and other types of support networks as well as learning what skills are needed to work effectively with both.

Lesson 1: Understanding Support Networks
    This lesson will help explain support networks. It covers the important role they play in the lives of people with disabilities. This lesson will help define support networks. It will help you identify different types of support networks. You will learn about the different roles each member plays in a support network. The lesson will help learners understand how to develop, maintain and expand the support networks of the people they support.
Lesson 2: Family Networks
    This lesson provides information about families. It will help you understand why they are a unique type of support network. You will learn the importance of families. You will learn how the individuals you support define who belongs in their family. You will begin to identify the contributions they make in supporting their family member. This lesson will help you understand how different cultures influence the relationships between people. You will learn how family values, beliefs and history are a part of everyone.
Lesson 3: Creating Partnerships with Support Network Members
    This lesson will help you understand the importance of developing partnerships with support networks. It will help you develop the skills needed for building partnerships with the family members and other support network members of the individuals you support. Finally, it will explore strategies you can implement to create successful partnerships.
Lesson 4: Problem Solving within Support Networks
    This lesson will help you work with family support networks by giving you strategies for solving problems, working through conflicts, and team building. It will help you recognize and make use of the gifts and talents of each member in a support network.

 

 

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